The Time Garden: A Review

A dazzlingly beautiful coloring book for all ages, The Time Garden will sweep you away into a whimsical cuckoo clock–inspired world, created in intricate pen and ink by the internationally best-selling Korean artist Daria Song. 


Journey through the doors of a mysterious cuckoo clock into its inky innerworkings to discover a magical land of clock gears, rooftops, starry skies, and giant flying owls—all ready for you to customize with whatever colors you can dream up.

Cuckoo . . . cuckoo . . . cuckoo . . . When the clock strikes midnight, you’ll wonder, was it all a dream?

The Time Garden features extra-thick craft paper, ideal for non bleed-through coloring, and the jacketed cover with flaps is removable and colorable. Special gold-foil stamping on the cover and spine and a To/From page make it perfect for gifting to adults and kids alike.





Coloring books have been around for years, but adult coloring books have been on the rise. Selling out everywhere, new ones popping up everywhere. The Time Garden is my first adult coloring book, and now I can see why everyone loves them. They may not have a lot of text to them but the beautiful and intricate pages will tell the story for you.

Daria Songs artwork is beyond beautiful on each page, each page going from a simple to a complicated design. Also what I like is that adult coloring books have endless pages to color. I mean by that you can take off the dust jacket, and color on the back of that. And you can color on the main cover of the book. Adult coloring books may be a bit pricier then your normal coloring book, but I think it is so worth the money you spend and the time you give.

I didn’t want to stop coloring it such a relaxing and stress relieving process for me. Such a great item.


If your interested or want to know anything about this or any up coming projects by the Artist and the Author of this book Daria Song you can check out her website.




I received this book from Blogging for Books for my honest review.

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