Human Acts: A Review

In the midst of a violent student uprising in South Korea, a young boy named Dong-ho is shockingly killed.

The story of this tragic episode unfolds in a sequence of interconnected chapters as the victims and the bereaved encounter suppression, denial, and the echoing agony of the massacre. From Dong-ho’s best friend who meets his own fateful end; to an editor struggling against censorship; to a prisoner and a factory worker, each suffering from traumatic memories; and to Dong-ho's own grief-stricken mother; and through their collective heartbreak and acts of hope is the tale of a brutalized people in search of a voice.

Review (sorry it's a short one.)

Human Acts was a tough read for me not because of the contents. I had a hard time liking and sticking with the POV. Every point of view had sort of the same story. All of them almost relived the same seen over and over. Most of them centered around Dong-Ho. Each character had their own story to tell, but I just wished the writer would have stuck to one.

The parts when they go from past to present unfortunately confused and kind of bored me. Human Acts didn't get my attention the way I was hoping.







I was given Human Acts for my honest review from the Blogging for Books program. (www.bloggingforbooks.com)

~Kellie

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